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If you take a cyclist to a bootcamp class // 7 Tips for Your First Class

Published in How To on Nov 17, 2016

So you want to try a bootcamp class? Maybe it’s that you have heard the hype about Barry’s Bootcamp or Orange Theory, or you are just getting in a rut with your spin routine.

Whatever it is, we are here to help ease your transition and take the fear away from trying your first bootcamp style workout class.

Recipe for Boot Camp Success

Do your research.

Each bootcamp class is different so make sure and read-up beforehand so you know what to expect. You will already be a little out of your element going in, so make sure you know the basic structure and muscle group focus (from lower body, to arms and abs) of the class. Research on the studio’s website/online to help you anticipate not only the structure of the class but the areas that will be sore tomorrow.

Meet your instructor.

Arrive 10-15 minutes before your first class and introduce yourself to the instructor. Don’t be shy and make sure they know your name and that it is your first time. Most likely you won’t be alone, there are always new bootcampers in class! Not only will this help you feel more comfortable to ask for help if your confused by a move (skullcrushers.. come again?), but this will also make the instructor more inclined to assist and support you during the class.

Kick on those cross training shoes.

Though normal running shoes are accepted in bootcamp classes, typically they do not support the pylometrics and lateral movements included in class. Swap out your Slipstreams for some cross training shoes, like our studio shoe The Latus, will help avoid injury and help you move more effectively. This shoes are great for for weightlifting, bodyweight movements and short runs.

Be kind to yourself.

Be extra mindful about the fact that this is a new experience and its okay to not be perfect the first time. Catch any negative self talk or frustration that comes to mind during the class. You are still learning and should be proud of yourself for trying something new.

Remember your abs and breath.

Be intentional about keeping your core tight especially during heavy reps to make sure and protect your back. Breathe through challenging exercises as your contract your abs and stay safe and resilient through the heavy reps and fast circuits.

Ignore those around you.

Keep your focus on your own treadmill or matt. Do not try and keep up with the person beside you squating 50 pounds or running at a speed of 12! If you are feeling like a million bucks and your body says sprint you sprint but the biggest tip is to be mindful of how you are feeling that day. Listen to your body. Don’t over do it and if you need to do an exercise with a lighter weight than suggested, do it to avoid any injury your first class.

Do NOT skip the stretch.

Many of those around you may pack up early and skip the cool down stretch but make sure and stay, especially your first time, to ease soreness, avoid energy and to bring your heart rate down. Added bonus it feels amazing and you leave feeling as zen as a yogi!

You don’t know unless you try!

Remember what is was like going to your first spin class? Clip into what? Tap it back to who?

The first time doing a new workout is always tricky, go slow be patient and most of all be proud of going out of your comfort zone! YOU got this!



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